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Reverse Outlining Worksheet

Reverse Outlining Worksheet

 

This worksheet is designed to help writers to do self-examinations of their argument and analysis according to a prompt.

 

Basic Argument

A. Write down your prompt. (Do not have to copy, but must write down all important aspects of the prompt)

 

 

 

B. Write down your argument. What is your response or answer to the prompt? In other words, what are you trying to say?

 

 

 

Examination

Introduction

A. Briefly explain how this introduction is organized. Do you have a hook? Bridge? Where is your thesis?

 

 

 

 

B. Thesis. First, write down your entire thesis.

 

 

 

 

C. Now, very specifically explain how your thesis answers to your prompt. In what way?

 

 

 

 

Body Paragraphs

A. Write down your main argument of your first paragraph.

 

 

 

 

B. Write down all types of evidence you are using (e.g., text, interview) and explain how each piece of evidence proves your point.

 

 

 

 

C. Do you think your argument supports your thesis? Why or why not?

 
 
 

 

 

A. Write down your main argument of your second paragraph.

 

 

 

 

B. Write down all types of evidence you are using (e.g., text, interview) and explain how each piece of evidence proves your point.

 

 

 

 

C. Do you think your argument supports your thesis? Why or why not?

 

 

 

 

A. Write down your main argument of your third paragraph.

 

 

 

 

B. Write down all types of evidence you are using (e.g., text, interview) and explain how each piece of evidence proves your point.

 

 

 

 

C. Do you think your argument supports your thesis? Why or why not?

 
 
 

 

 

(repeat this process for all remaining body paragraphs)

 

 

Conclusion

A. Explain in what way you summarize your point. Also, explain how your summary is equivalent to your thesis (remember, do not repeat your thesis!).

 

 

 

 

B. Write down how your conclusion concluded. Do you stop at summarizing your points? Or are you going further and giving a more interesting perspective about your argument?

 

 

 

 

C. In what way do you think that your conclusion is strong? In what way do you think your conclusion needs improvement? What could you do differently?

 

 

 

 

Sam Park

Student Learning Center, University of California, Berkeley

©2008 UC Regents

 


 

This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs 3.0 Unported License.